About Emergency Medical Technicians


What does an EMT do?

An EMT, also referred to as an Emergency Medical Technician or an EMT-Basic, may perform duties such as caring for patients at the scene of an incident or emergency and while transporting patients to a healthcare facility (such as a hospital) by ambulance. EMTs have the skills to assess a patient’s condition.  They also have the skills needed to manage respiratory, cardiac, and trauma emergencies.  The specific job duties of an EMT may vary based on the state in which they work.


Where can EMTs work?

EMTs can be found working in several different settings.  They may work for ambulance companies, fire departments, and even hospitals.  Some EMTs (and Paramedics) may even be contracted by local venues to work at large-scale events


How much can I make as an EMT?

The US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics has helpful information on various occupations, including median salary information.  The information for EMTs and Paramedics can be referenced by visiting this page:  https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/emts-and-paramedics.htm#tab-1.

It’s important to note that the information listed here is National information, so it’s pooled together and not specific to any particular geographic location.  It also includes information on all EMTs and Paramedics regardless of their experience on the job, their work setting, etc.


Are there other career opportunities for EMTs?

Many may choose a career as an EMT as a means for breaking into the healthcare field.  For example, after becoming an EMT, some may choose to further their education (and career) by training to become a Paramedic.  In addition, some choose to become an EMT as a means to get experience as they pursue other careers in healthcare such as a nurse or a physician assistant.

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Becoming an EMT


Is EMT a good career?

A career as an EMT can be extremely rewarding.  That’s because the work they do daily is important, and in times of an emergency, they can be the difference between life and death.  Many may choose to pursue a career as an EMT because they want a career where they can make a difference and give back in their local community.  Equally, a career as an EMT can also be challenging.  No two days are likely the same when you’re an EMT, and you’re often thrust into a variety of emergency situations.  While the work can be stressful, many take great pride in knowing that the work they do is meaningful and helps people in their local community.


How do I become an emt?

To become an EMT, the first step one must take is getting the necessary training.  You will want to enroll in an EMT training program approved by the state in which you wish to become licensed, and work.  Once you successfully complete your EMT training, you’ll need to challenge the NREMT exam.  Upon successfully completing this exam, you can pursue licensure as an EMT-Basic with the state.  In Michigan, licensure is required to obtain gainful employment as an EMT.


How long is EMT training?

The length of your EMT training will depend upon the program you select, but generally speaking, EMT training can be completed in a few months.  In addition to timeline and schedules, be sure you have a good understanding of the EMT training program you’re signing up for and how the classes are structured and delivered.


How much do EMTs make a year?

The US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics has helpful information in regards to salaries, on various occupations, including EMTs and Paramedics.  For specific information on EMTs and Paramedics you can visit this page on the BLS website:  https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/emts-and-paramedics.htm#tab-1.

Please note – the information listed here on the BLS website is National information, so it’s pooled together and not specific to any particular geographic location.  It also includes information on all EMTs and Paramedics regardless of their experience on the job, their work setting, etc. 


Will I be able to find a job?

While there are a number of factors that may influence a candidate’s ability to obtain gainful employment in their respective field, it’s always a good idea to look at the occupation you’re considering to see if the job outlook is positive.

According to the US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of EMTs and Paramedics is projected to grow 7% from 2021-2031.  This projected growth is as fast as average for all occupations.  1

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About the Dorsey College Emergency Medical Technician program


What will be covered in the program?

The Emergency Medical Technician program at Dorsey College includes coverage of topics such as basic life support, knowledge application and skills necessary to provide patient care to sick and injured patients, and medical transportation to/from an emergency or health care facility.  Patient assessment, basic airway procedures (including Combitube and King Airway), cardiopulmonary resuscitation, treatment of patients in shock, spinal immobilization, and patient privacy are also included in the program.  Students may also learn effective strategies as they prepare to challenge the National Certification examination.


Is the program hands-on?

Yes! Students in the Emergency Medical Technician program will have opportunities to practice the skills they are learning in class and during unpaid clinical hours.


How long is the program?

The Emergency Medical Technician program at Dorsey College is designed to be completed within the timeframe of 22-24 weeks (based on a 10 hour per week schedule) or 11-12 weeks (based on a 20 hours per week schedule), as published in the school catalog.


Why should I choose Dorsey College?

Students choose Dorsey College over other career training schools for a variety of reasons. You can learn more by visiting The Dorsey Difference page.


Which Dorsey College campuses offer my program?

The Emergency Medical Technician program is offered at the following Dorsey College campus locations:  


How do I enroll?

If you’re interested in enrolling in the Emergency Medical Technician program at Dorsey College, the first step you should take is meeting with one of our Admissions Representatives.  Request information online and a member of our team will be back in touch with you shortly.   You can read more about our Admissions process on our Admissions information page.


Will the program prepare me for licensure?

Yes.  The Emergency Medical Technician program at Dorsey College is designed to prepare students to challenge the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) exam for EMT-B after successfully completing our program and meeting the necessary requirements to apply for the exam.  

Dorsey College has determined that its Emergency Medical Technician training program curriculum is sufficient to fulfill educational requirements for licensure in the State of Michigan only. No educational determinations have been made for any other state, district, or US territory in regards to licensure requirements.


Is your school accredited?

Yes, you can read more by visiting our Accreditation page.


What are the tuition and fees for the program?

Information regarding the current tuition and fees for the Dorsey College Emergency Medical Technician program can be accessed by visiting our Student Consumer Information page by clicking here.


Can you help me find a job after graduation?

Dorsey College offers Career Services assistance to all program completers, however, job placement is not guaranteed by Dorsey College. You can learn more about the assistance our Career Services team offers by visiting our Career Services for Students and Graduates page.

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Additional Information

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, EMTs and Paramedics,

at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/emts-and-paramedics.htm (visited November 28, 2022).